Introducing “Winds Of Change”

Let’s get straight to it! This is our introductory episode to our new podcastWinds of Change.  All about the people, places and history of Wyoming! Its’ conversational, fun and interesting. Wyoming Humanities has celebrated 50 years in Wyoming. We are an organization that produces programs, supports great ideas and provides grants to many non-profits and communities around the state.

Emy diGrappa, Chloe Flagg, and Lucas Fralick will be sharing and talking about the many faces and facets that make up our big state.  We relish our wide-open spaces and small communities – even thoughthathas its own unique challenges.  Experts will talk about the current and historical happenings that make us who we are today.

We are exploring the persistence and the changing landscape of the West - the unbreakable bond between people and their love for the land, wide-open spaces and the ever-changing Wyoming identity.

We want to hear from you!

Follow this link to share your Wyoming story!https://calendly.com/wyoming-humanities/winds-of-changeor emailemy@thinkwy.orgfor more information.

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Emy diGrappa (00:01):

Welcome to Winds of Change. I am your host, Emy diGrappa. Winds of Change is brought to you by Wyoming Humanities, where our mission is to strengthen Wyoming's democracy by creating an environment of inspiration, creativity, wisdom, idea sharing, and understanding. And so comes the Wind of Change podcast, where we focus on the people, places, history, and stories of Wyoming. We talk about identity, community, land, change, and what it means to thrive in the state. Listen to folks from across our state share their connection to Wyoming and home.

           In Wyoming, we are three degrees of connection, not separation. You are a friend, neighbor, and acquaintance to everyone in the state in one form or another. In this podcast, we will share narratives and stories. Listeners will learn some history and conversations on a wide array of topics for you to discover and think about. And our hope is that our Wyoming people will get inspired to tell their Wyoming story.  

           Now, Winds of Change podcast is launching with two co-hosts, Chloe Flagg and Lucas Fralick. My colleagues and partners in launching this program are excited to talk to you, and so I want to welcome them today. Welcome, Chloe.

Chloe Flagg (01:21):

Hi, Emy. I am thrilled. It's here. It's happening. I can't wait for this podcast. I love Wyoming. I love the people of Wyoming. And I can't wait to learn all about it.

Emy diGrappa (01:33):

Well, what do you feel is the most important of those topics? Do you have an idea? When you think about Wyoming and you think about change or you think about [inaudible 00:01:43].

Chloe Flagg (01:45):

Mm-hmm (affirmative). I think about community when I think about Wyoming. I think about our sense of community, and not just our small communities that we were born into, where we come from, where we, we choose to live in, but our community as the broader state. I think about that a lot. But Lucas, how are you?

Lucas Fralick (02:03):

Yes. Uh, I'm great. Thank you. I too am very thrilled for this podcast. I feel like we've been waiting for several, several weeks to get going, so it's very fun to, to be here today virtually to have this happen.  

           When I think of Wyoming, often it's identity for me. And I think these things are not mutually exclusive, obviously. I think they're all connected in some interweb of stuff. But as a proponent of identity, in this case, I feel that we're all in, in this part of the state that I'm from anyway... Each part of the state has a different culture and they identify themselves differently as any other part of the state, right? So in my part, in Gillette, we see each other differently than we would down in Laramie, for example, or anywhere else for that matter.  

           But yeah, to Chloe's point, as a state, we all kind of have the same sort of Wyoming sense. And for me, a lot of that is Wyoming's capability to persist and adapt, which I don't think is talked about a lot these days. So I'm hoping this podcast can reveal that side of, uh, of our state's personality (laughs) that I think is often ignored.

Emy diGrappa (03:21):

Well, thanks, Lucas. And I just want to remind everybody to please tune in. We encourage you to listen, learn and share, and be a part of the conversation, story, and history of Wyoming. We welcome all stories and all voices that showcase who we are and what the future holds for Wyomingites. Share your story by texting me or emailing me, emy@thinkwy.org, that's E-M-Y@T-H-I-N-K-W-Y.org, and I will be back in touch with you. My phone number is 307-699-2680 if texting is better for you. This is brought to you by Wyoming Humanities. Stay connected with us. Thank you for listening.